Country Profiles

June 19, 2018
K4Health interviews MCH Director Niger MOH

K4Health Program Officer for Strategic Partnerships interviews Dr. Adama Kimou, Director of Maternal and Child Health, Ministry of Health, Niger

Background

Although each country faces unique challenges in meeting the health needs of its population, within a geographic region, governments, civil society organizations, and donors can benefit from learning from the experiences of their counterparts in other countries. K4Health partners with regional bodies to improve health in West Africa through strengthened collaboration, coordination, and knowledge management (KM).

Ouagadougou Partnership Knowledge Management Assessment

The Ouagadougou Partnership (OP) was created in 2011 and includes nine Francophone West African countries, donors, and civil society members with objectives to elevate the position of family planning in the social and economic landscape of the partnership countries, to accelerate the implementation of the countries’ family planning strategies and action plans, and to ensure coordination of donor investments. The Ouagadougou Partnership Coordinating Unit (OPCU) facilitates coordination among donors and member countries, as well as the sharing of information, progress, challenges, and successes among member countries.

February 23, 2017

Background

Although each country faces unique challenges in meeting the health needs of its population, within a geographic region, governments, civil society organizations, and donors can benefit from learning from the experiences of their counterparts in other countries. K4Health has partnered with two regional bodies to improve health in West Africa through strengthened collaboration, coordination, and knowledge management (KM).

October 29, 2015

Background

The symbiotic nature of health programs across the East Africa region presents both challenges and opportunities. Strong health systems and outcomes in one partner state contributes to another’s improvement, while poor health systems and outcomes can threaten its neighbors.

A regional approach is well recognized as a valuable and efficient path to support individual partner state health priorities as well as to scale up improved health outcomes. Regional Intergovernmental Organizations (RIGOs) play a key role in achieving improved health outcomes across the region by promoting collaboration and serving as a knowledge hub for partner states. Inhe East Africa region, which is comprised of Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda, the East African Community plays this important convening role.

Despite the strong efforts of the RIGOs to coordinate and harmonize across the region, challenges remain with systematically collecting and sharing relevant and usable knowledge among partner states to improve their health programs. Partner states face challenges in accessing strategic information and knowledge from local and international researchers due to limitations of current sharing tools and strategies. The absence of a harmonized approach to using global and regional learning serves to weaken individual partner state programs, their advocacy agendas, and program implementation. Knowledge management is a powerful tool to address these challenges.

June 04, 2012
Ethiopia FMOH KM Workshop

Group photo of the FMOH participants that took part in the 3-day KM training workshop facilitated by K4Health and hosted by the International Institute for Primary Health Care in Ethiopia (IIfPHC-E). Credit: IIfPHC-E photographer.

 

Background

The Ethiopia Federal Ministry of Health plays a critical role in information flow. However, it often receives more information than it dispatches, which creates a situation in which information is slow to diffuse. To ensure the Ethiopian health sector’s continued progress in meeting the Sustainable Development Goals, the availability and flow of information and knowledge throughout the health sector, especially in a decentralized environment, is critical.

March 30, 2012
In Depth Interview of Midwives in Kediri

A member of the ICMM team interviews a midwife for the ICMM baseline survey. Credit: Universitas Indonesia

 

Background

The maternal mortality rate in Indonesia is among the highest in Asia, and more than half of Indonesian couples who want to stop childbearing still rely on short-acting methods such as oral contraceptive pills and injectables. This mismatch of method with fertility intentions points to the lack of availability and accessibility of long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) and permanent methods (PMs).

The Improving Contraceptive Method Mix (ICMM) Project

The Improving Contraceptive Method Mix (ICMM) Project sought to address this concern through targeted district-level advocacy–working with decision makers to revitalize local advocacy groups and make the case for greater family planning (FP) budgets and increased availability and training for long-acting methods. ICMM also sought to determine the effectiveness of these advocacy activities, so they could be scaled up in other areas of Indonesia.