Ghana

  • West African Health Organization KM Assessment

    Background

    Although each country faces unique challenges in meeting the health needs of its population, within a geographic region, governments, civil society organizations, and donors can benefit from learning from the experiences of their counterparts in other countries. K4Health has partnered with two regional bodies to improve health in West Africa through strengthened collaboration, coordination, and knowledge management (KM).

  • Continuing Professional Development in Ghana

    CHN On the Go

    Logo of the CHN on the Go mobile application. Credit: Produced by Grameen Foundation/Ghana under the Concern Worldwide US, Inc. (CUS) Innovations for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health initiative, Care Community Hub (CCH) project

    Background

    Community health nurses (CHNs) are often the primary providers of maternal, newborn, and child health care (MNCH) in rural Ghanaian communities. Yet CHNs face significant challenges to address the health care needs of their communities, which are geographically diffuse and often under-resourced. While CHNs serve a crucial role, they are the least credentialed nurses within the Ghana Health Service, and have limited opportunities for career advancement. Their experience maps with global trends, which indicated that although there are more in-service training programs developed for health workers than ever before, a continuum of learning from pre-service to in-service training is needed.

    Professional Development for Community Health Nurses in Ghana through Mobile Learning

    K4Health collaborated with Ghana Health Service (GHS) and Grameen Foundation under the Concern Worldwide US, Inc. (CUS) Innovations for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health initiative, Care Community Hub (CCH) project to provide CHNs in five rural districts of Ghana access to professional development courses on a variety of family planning (FP) and maternal, newborn, and child health (MNCH) topics via an Android app. Our goal was twofold: 1) to provide accessible, high-quality, relevant educational opportunities to an indispensable group of primary care providers and 2) to understand how the provision of learning materials could improve workplace satisfaction and equip CHNs with new technical knowledge.